The CDL is ready move on from Vanguard to Modern Warfare 2. Here’s everything you need to know about the 2023 Call of Duty League season.

The 2022 Call of Duty League season is nearing the end, following an intense L.A. Thieves victory at CDL Champs. While professional players weren’t exactly thrilled with Vanguard, it was an entertaining end to the latest Call of Duty season. With that said, it’s time to turn the page to the Call of Duty League (CDL) in 2023. 

League operators have revealed some curious details regarding the upcoming year, which will be played in Infinity Ward’s Modern Warfare 2. The latest update from the Call of Duty League provided insight into changes to roster construction and even gave us an official start date. 

When does the 2023 Call of Duty League season begin?

Call of Duty World Championships 2022 Winners Los Angeles Thieves
Photo credit: Ariel Ben-Abraham/ESPAT

According to an excerpt from the CDL, the Vanguard season ends August 21 at 11:59 PM PST, with the next one kicking off on August 22 at midnight PST. Then, all player contracts that the teams have not extended will expire, and those individuals move to free agency. 

Once the 2023 League Year begins, free agents can negotiate contracts with any teams they’d like and submit those to the League Office for approval. We can expect some roster shuffling, particularly from teams that failed to make CDL Champs 2022. It’s the proverbial roster mania that fans and players have come to anticipate. 

The League outlines critical roster construction details, salary changes, & more

Call of Duty League

The meat and potatoes of the CDL’s latest correspondence lay within its information about roster changes and construction. The landscape is a bit different moving forward. First, it’s worth mentioning that the League has increased minimum player salaries to $55,225 USD – a sizable increase from the $50,900 minimum base salary from the 2021 announcement

Furthermore, the player benefits include healthcare and retirement benefits. Each organization must also afford at least 50% of prize pool earnings to the competitors. This change is massive for players entering the CDL looking to prove themselves. It also gives talented players a solid baseline for salary negotiations. 

Other noteworthy items highlighted in the 2023 Call of Duty League announcement

  • Teams cannot execute trades, extensions, or free-agent signings outside of the pre-determined timeframe
  • The Call of Duty League takes no part in contract negotiations
  • Long-term player commitments must extend to at least one season and can include a unilateral option to extend another season. 
  • Long-term contracts can only last for a maximum term of three seasons
  • Teams must fulfill a pre-determined buyout fee should they choose to terminate a non-guaranteed player contract.
  • Teams can sign players to 14-day contracts but cannot surpass two 14-day contracts for the same player. 
  • If a player signs for two 14-day contracts, the team can either sign the player for the rest of the 2023 season, or the player will become a free agent.
  • The CDL defines a “Two-Way Player” as an individual who can compete in Challenger events and other Call of Duty competitions.
  • There is no limit to the number of Two-Way Player designations.
  • Up to two Two-Way Players can compete on the same Challengers roster.
  • Two-Way Players from different CDL rosters can compete on the same Challengers team
  • The announcement says Two-Way Players cannot compete in a Challengers competition for seven days after participating in an official CDL match.
  • Teams must submit written approval to the League Office before a Two-Way Player can compete in a Challengers event.

That covers everything you need to know about the 2023 Call of Duty League season. The storylines are plentiful following the exciting Grand Finals showdown between L.A. Thieves and Atlanta FaZe. Now, it’s time to prepare for what roster changes may lie ahead.

Stay tuned to esports.gg for more Call of Duty news and updates!

Filed Under
Matthew

Matthew "MJP" Pryor

| Twitter: @MJP_FN

Matt “MJP” Pryor began following esports in 2008 when Halo 3 was on top of the world. He is now a Fortnite fanatic who has watched the game’s casual and competitive development since the 2019 Fortnite World Cup. Matt plays the game often while reporting on everything from skin collaborations to tournaments and everything in between.