Users can rest safe as no passwords were exposed in the data breach. Meanwhile, it is highly recommended to enable Two-Factor Authentication to increase security.

A major data breach earlier this month gave fans a glimpse into how much their favorite streamers make off Twitch. There were also concerns about leaked passwords and credit cards details in the source code leak. While Twitch had already earlier confirmed the data breach, it has now released a statement that highlights the scope of the data breach. 

No passwords were exposed in the data breach last week says Twitch. The streaming giant is also confident that no credit card numbers or bank information were accessed in the hack. This should come as a major relief to Twitch users and content creators.

What was the reason for the Data Breach?

Changes to the server configuration allowed third-party access to the servers, says Twitch. 

The incident was a result of a server configuration change that allowed improper access by an unauthorized third party.

The Amazon-owned company has already taken steps to fix the issue and to further secure its systems. Meanwhile, after a thorough review of the data breach, Twitch confirms that the data breach only affected a small fraction of users . Twitch is contacting all customers whose data is at risk as a result of the data breach.

We take our responsibility to protect your data very seriously. We have taken steps to further secure our service, and we apologize to our community.

Twitch has also issued an apology to the community and has promised to further secure the platform.


The data breach leaked the payouts for top streamers on the platform since 2019.  

The leak also revealed Vapor, which is Amazon’s upcoming Steam competitor. 

As an immediate response to the data breach, Twitch increased its bug bounty payouts, according to TheRegister.

Stay tuned to esports.gg for the latest streaming news and updates

Rohan Samal - Eurasia Editor

Rohan Samal

Eurasia Editor | Twitter: @rohan_esports | Twitch: rohan_3105

Eurasia Editor for esports.gg. Found esports through gaming nearly 6 years ago and has been involved ever since. Primarily a Dota 2 player, but has the occasional experience in FPS games. Even tried (unsuccessfully) to go pro in Overwatch.