Spartan has been fined over $3k for criticizing the state of Halo Infinite. 

Tyler “Spartan” Ganza, one of the most prominent Halo players in the scene, has been fined by his team eUnited and the Halo Championship Series (HCS). The pro was allegedly fined $3250 dollars for disparaging Halo Infinite on social media. News of the fines first broke on May 11th, as Spartan took to Twitter to complain about the state of the game.

According to Spartan, he was fined $2500 dollars by Halo Infinite developers 343, who operate the HCS. He was also reportedly fined a further $750 by his team eUnited. In his initial tweet, he compared this to the $2k he reportedly shelled out to get players to the HCS event in Kansas City.

The HSC has a strict code of conduct pertaining to misconduct in the HCS. Fines are levied at a rate of between $500-$1000 for misconduct or social media misconduct. Spartan’s criticism would fall into the latter category. However, the maximum punishment for social media misconduct by the HCS is an indefinite suspension. So far Spartan has escaped this, but the potential for hasher punishments than fines are there.

What did eUnited Spartan say?

Spartan’s punishment was seemingly levied because of his vocal criticism of Halo Infinite on social media. In just the past ten days, multiple tweets from the player have picked apart the state of the game. It seems the player has been fined for three Tweets, as well as by eUnited.

343 has drawn major criticism from fans of the game for its handling of Halo Infinite. But Spartan is the most prominent and vocal of the critics thus far. What’s more, he’s risking suspension and fines to do so. Clearly, his livelihood is worth risking to make a point about the game. For now though, Spartan has gone back to streaming the game. The eUnited pro won’t let a few fines get in the way of playing some Halo.

Michael Hassall -

Michael Hassall

| Twitter: @hoffasaurusx

Michael is a UK-based content creator who caught the esports bug in 2010, but took eight years to figure out he should write about it. Throwing away a promising career in marketing and PR, he now specialises in MOBAs, covering League of Legends, Dota 2, and esports in general since 2019. When not glued to tournaments taking place on the other side of the globe, he spends time nurturing an unhealthy addiction to MMOs and gacha games.