Epic Games’ latest update regarding competitive Fortnite details the lack of an FNCS in Chapter 3 Season 4 and more tournaments coming soon.

Fortnite Chapter 3 Season 4 is rapidly approaching after a summer in the post-collision “Vibin” era. As a result, Epic Games’ preparation for what lies ahead is in full motion. While casual fans eagerly await Chapter 3 Season 4, competitive players and followers are equally curious to see what’s next for Fortnite. Four months ago, Epic announced the game would return to an official LAN setting during the fall season. It’s now become clear that there will be no online FNCS in Season 4.

This morning, Epic Games published a blog post detailing what fans and competitors can expect from a competitive standpoint next season. Here’s everything we learned from this information.

No FNCS in Chapter 3 Season 4 due to FNCS Invitational

Perhaps the most significant news from Epic’s blog post is that there will be no Fortnite Champion Series (FNCS) event in Season 4. Since 2019, the FNCS has been the most consistent tournament in Fortnite, handing out millions of dollars across multiple events. Unfortunately, the timing of Season 4 and the upcoming FNCS Invitational 2022 made it impossible for Epic to host a traditional online FNCS.

“In Chapter 3 – Season 4, we will not be hosting an online FNCS. This is in part to prepare for the upcoming FNCS Invitational and in part due to the timing of Chapter 3 – Season 4. With the introduction of Divisional Cups and updates to prizing, we hope that you’ll enjoy competing in the new Season and look forward to the spectacle of the FNCS Invitational taking place in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA, on November 13 and 14.”

Epic Games statement regarding no FNCS in Chapter 3 Season 4

New Divisional Cups announced

Fortnite Divisional Cups format in place of FNCS Season 4
Fortnite Divisional Cups breakdown

Epic Games has revealed a new brand of tournaments in place of FNCS Season 4. Dubbed Divisional Cups. This competition is quite the change from what players have come to expect each season. Also, it’s somewhat confusing, so we’ll do our best to make it easy to understand.

Fortnite Divisional Cups are duo tournaments that will run weekly between three classifications; Contender, Challenger, and Elite. To qualify for these, hopeful competitors can compete in the inaugural Placement Cup on September 24. Duos hope to achieve a top 1,000 finish to unlock the Challenger Division or the top 200 to unlock the Elite Division. Those below the top 1,000 teams will settle for the Contender Division.

It’s worth noting that both players in a given duo must reach the Contenders in Arena Mode to gain access to the Placement Cup. Furthermore, you can refer to the image above from Epic Games to look at how the Divisional Cups will operate during Season 4. While it’s not FNCS Season 4, it’s a more structured and consistent approach to competitive Fortnite.

Additional Divisional Cup details

  • Fortnite Divisional Cups will take place each week.
  • There will be two days of Fortnite Divisional Cups per week, on Wednesdays and Fridays in all regions.
  • Elite players must compete on Day 2 of the Elite Cups to be eligible to participate in the Elite Cup Weekly Final on Saturday evenings.
  • The top 40 duos in all regions excluding NA East and Europe will earn a prize in the Divisional Cup Finals.
  • Epic plans to host seven weeks of regular competition this Season.
  • You cannot be relegated to a lower division for poor play in tournaments or inactivity.
  • Divisional Cups are not region-locked, but you must improve your Arena rank in each region you plan to compete.
  • Placement Cups are region-locked.
  • Divisional Cups are open to players on all platforms excluding iOS.
  • Competitors can switch teammates so long as their new teammate has the same rank.

Lastly, here is the qualification threshold for all regions in the Divisional Cup format, which again will effectively stand in place of FNCS Season 4:

Oceania, Asia, Middle East, Brazil, NA West

  • 10 teams will advance from Challenger to Elite per week.
  • 50 teams will advance from Contender to Challenger per week.

NA East

  • 20 teams will advance from Challenger to Elite per week.
  • 100 teams will advance from Contender to Challenger per week.

Europe

  • 30 teams will advance from Challenger to Elite per week.
  • 150 teams will advance from Contender to Challenger per week.

Arena Mode Preseason period is no more

Most competitive players will be happy to hear that Season 4 won’t feature an Arena Mode Preseason period. Epic Games introduced this concept many seasons ago, hoping to balance the loot pool before tournaments began. However, Epic eliminated the preseason due to the Divisional Cup format.

Zero Build, Late Game, and Console Cups to continue in Chapter 3 Season 4

Fortnite Zero Build

Epic continues to offer a wide range of competitive Fortnite experiences to compensate for a lack of FNCS in Season 4. First, the Zero Build mode has taken on a life of its own. Both traditional Battle Royale players and Zero Build experts have enjoyed padding their earnings in these tournaments.

Additionally, competitive Fortnite players can expect more Late Game competitions when Epic resolves the game mode’s issues. Lastly, console-specific tournaments aren’t going anywhere in Chapter 3 Season 4. Epic plans to host monthly PlayStation Cups and the season-ending Console Champions Cup.

Here is the tentative competitive schedule for Season 4:

  • Zero Build Duos Quick Cups – Wednesdays and Fridays
  • Zero Build Squads Cash Cup – Saturdays
  • Divisional Cups – Wednesdays and Fridays
  • Divisional Elite Cup Finals – Saturdays
  • PlayStations Cups – September, October, and November

The lack of an FNCS Season 4 is unfortunate, but plenty is happening in the competitive Fortnite scene. We’ll have to see how the prize pools shake out. Additionally, a successful FNCS Invitational could solidify other LAN events.

Stay tuned to esports.gg for more Fortnite news and updates!

Filed Under
Matthew

Matthew "MJP" Pryor

| Twitter: @MJP_FN

Matt “MJP” Pryor began following esports in 2008 when Halo 3 was on top of the world. He is now a Fortnite fanatic who has watched the game’s casual and competitive development since the 2019 Fortnite World Cup. Matt plays the game often while reporting on everything from skin collaborations to tournaments and everything in between.