It’s TI10 season! and Valve has added some cool new features to the Twitch streams. Fans can now cheer for their favorite teams sitting at home.

It’s been a long two years. Two years since OG lifted the Aegis, two years since fans got a glimpse of the TI stage, the thrill and the euphoria that accompanies it. Valve is introducing a new cheering system as well as improved Twitch Integration for TI10 to allow Dota 2 fans to engage with this year’s event.

18 teams have arrived in Bucharest to compete in the biggest prize pool event in esports history. For these teams, there’s not $40 million on the line, but it is the glory of possibly being able to lift the Aegis that drives them.

How to Cheer for Dota 2 Teams during TI10?

Spectator Cheering and Supporter's Club representation at TI10.
Visual representations highlight the support for a team at TI10. There will also be audience roar depending on the number of cheers a team gets. Image Credit: Valve.

Valve had to make the unfortunate decision to cancel a live audience at TI10 due to the pandemic. The decision was not made lightly and for the first time in history, The International will not have fans attending the event. 

Valve has introduced new ways for fans to engage with the stream. The new cheering feature allows fans to make their ‘voices heard’, says Valve. 

When watching a match in-client, and soon via Twitch, simply click on the team logos at the top of the screen to send a cheer for your team. We take all of the cheers from the entire audience and sum them up, then represent them visually on screen as well as with the roar of the crowd. 

Fans who are Supporter’s Club members get something more in their cheers. In addition to the roar of the crowd, Supporter’s Club cheers are also represented visually on the screen.

TI10 to have enhanced Twitch integration

The Twitch Tooltip that allows fans to hover their mouse over an ability to read its in-game tooltip description.
Hover your mouse over an ability or item to see its full tooltip information. Image Credit: Valve.

The International is the event when Dota 2 gets a lot of interest from outside the community. The event brings many new players who are keen to get a look at one of the finest MOBAs out there.

But Dota 2 is a complex game and it’s not always friendly towards new players. Instead of having to download the game to understand the game, bukka and SUNSfan have created a Dota 2 Tooltips Twitch Extension. This extension allows fans to interact with the stream.

Here’s a list of things Dota 2 fans can do with the Twitch extension:

  • Looking to clarify how an ability or item works? Simply mouse over it to see the full in-game tooltip information.
  • Complete in-game predictions, the same as in the Dota 2 client. At the beginning of the match, you will be presented with 4 questions to predict the outcome to—get them right and earn Compendium Points to further your progress along the Compendium Reward Line.
  • Cheer for your favorite teams by clicking their logos at the top of the screen.
  • And finally, we’re also bringing back Twitch Drops—simply watch 1 hour of any of the matches throughout the tournament on Twitch and you will receive a free drop of The International 2021 Lineage Treasure.

How to Connect Twitch to Steam?

Before you can cheer for your favorite teams, you have to connect your Twitch and Steam accounts. Here’s how you can connect your Twitch and Steam accounts.

  • Go to Settings on your Twitch Account
  • Click the Connections Tab
  • Scroll to Steam and continue
  • Login to Steam to connect your Twitch and Steam accounts

TI10 will have multiple ongoing games during the group stage. The main Twitch channel will feature a multi-cast. Fans can watch individual streams on the sub-streams for each language (e.g. dota2ti_2 – dota2ti_5).

Stay tuned to esports.gg for more Dota 2 coverage around The International.

Filed Under
Rohan Samal - Eurasia Editor

Rohan Samal

Eurasia Editor | Twitter: @rohan_esports | Twitch: rohan_3105

Eurasia Editor for esports.gg. Found esports through gaming nearly 6 years ago and has been involved ever since. Primarily a Dota 2 player, but has the occasional experience in FPS games. Even tried (unsuccessfully) to go pro in Overwatch.