KRL-backed French org admits to streaming scrims without permission: Lengthy Twitter battle ensues cover image

KRL-backed French org admits to streaming scrims without permission: Lengthy Twitter battle ensues

KRL and GenOne vs. kassad.

In a bizarre chain of events, GenOneEsports, a streamer-funded, French CS2 organization, released a now-deleted statement following a back-and-forth between CEO KRL and Bleed Esports’ coach kassad.

The beef began after kassad revealed KRL had been streaming practice matches without asking permission from opponents. This led to a lengthy Twitter battle between KRL and kassad, and later the GenOneEsports Twitter account and the Bleed coach.

GenOneEsports states that they “implement strict measures to safeguard the privacy of (their) opponents,” despite openly admitting that they stream their entire practice without permission “less than 10 percent” of the time.

GenOneEsports, KRL vs. kassad

The now-deleted statement (Image via GenOneEsports Twitter/Screenshot by Esports.gg)
The now-deleted statement (Image via GenOneEsports Twitter/Screenshot by Esports.gg)

After kassad brought the privacy issue to the community’s attention, KRL responded by ensuring that names were not visible, and no one could determine who was on the opposing team. However, he topped it all off by saying “suck my balls, little c**t.” This retort was made despite claims that kassad gave KRL no chance to respond, according to the GenOneEsports statement.

The GenOneEsports Twitter account posted more digs at kassad as time went on. They even went as far as to claim that the Starladder Berlin Major 2019 semi-finalist hadn't achieved his dreams, and was attempting to quash other players' dreams out of spite.

(Screenshot by Esports.gg)
(Screenshot by Esports.gg)

Even with the bold choice of words from a CEO and GenOneEsports Twitter account, there has been a change thanks to this commotion. GenOneEsports shared that they will ask permission to stream opponents' practice sessions from now on. 

One of the main issues with this, apart from the obvious lack of courtesy, is the fact that this means that any other squad could watch these practice games and potentially get a sneak peek into what’s coming. That is if they could determine who was playing.

Fortunately, this won’t be a problem with GenOne anymore, if they follow what’s on their statement.

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